You are in [Places] [Bridge Street Properties] [9 Bridge Street]
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Summary:

Earliest information: 1470
Original estate: Priory of St. John
Common Rights? Yes
Date of current building: 18th century
Grade II Listed

Thumbnail History:

Common rights, quit rent 4d.

1470 owned by Priory of St. John -> Sir John Thynne -> Hidden -> Price -> Sheaffe -> Atkins (fellmongers) -> Allen -> Garrard -> Atherton -> Halcombe -> Primitive Methodist Chapel built.

Description of Property:

From Listed Building records: House, now house and shop. 18th century. Tiled roof, 2 gabled dormers, rendered walls. 2 storeys and attic. First floor: 3 light timber casement to left, 20th century casement to right. Ground floor: shop window, with cambered head to left, plain door with rectangular fanlight to right.

Photo Gallery:

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- 9 Bridge Street Mar 2007

- Bridge Street c1890

- Arthur Clifford's retirement, 1993

- Furr & Company move to 7 Bridge Street Feb 2006

- The entrance to the Sunday School, Aug 2012

Timeline:

1470 (NH) Owned by Priory Hospital of St. John. Whether the house was used by the priory or was let to rent is not known, but its situation so near to the priory itself (only the mill intervening between the two buildings) suggests that it may have originally been a building used for hospital purposes. By the 16th century, however , evidence suggests that it was likely to have been let as a source of rent for the priory.

1548 (NH) Henry VIII dissolved the Priory. When the priory was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1548 the king granted the priory property to Sir John Thynne, of Longleat fame. Thynne leased the property.

1552 (NH) In 1552 the building was said to be "late in the tenure of ..?.. Jennyns , and now of John Bytheway."

? (NH) Sir John Thynne died, and the property became again at the disposal of the crown and (via court middlemen such as Dru Drury and Edward Downing) it was purchased as an investment, along with other former priory property, by Anthony Hidden, Lord of the Manor of Hidden cum Eddington

1591 (NH) Anthony Hidden died. Youngest son Roger Hidden inherited. His stepfather, Robert Roberts of Salisbury, held it in trust until Roger was of age. Roger then sold it to ... Price, a London merchant, soon resold to Dr. Thomas Sheaffe, a Canon of St. George's Windsor.

1612 (NH) Sheaffe sold freehold to Henry Atkins, the sitting tenant. The Atkins family were owners for over 100 years of the building, garden, and a small plot of land which separated it from the Mill on the north side. See also: 1612 Indenture Sheaff to Atkins.

1618 (NH) Henry Atkins died. Son William Atkins inherited. William Atkins, who may have been born in the house when his father was tenant of Anthony Hidden, succeeded to the freehold when his father Henry died in 1618.
1643 (NH) William Atkins died.

1676 (QR) Edward Atkins, fell monger (leather goods). This is presumably the Edward Atkins who is described in later deeds of the property as fellmonger, that is trader in calf and sheep skins for manufacture of leather goods (such as gloves).
When Edward died he left the property and business to two sons William and Edward Atkins, who continued the business as fellmongers.

1729 (Colin Scarrett) Sale by William Atkins and Anne and Edward (fellmongers) of 1 messuage and garden, and 1 orchard to William Allen (glover), for £60.

1736 During alterations by Furr's (1994) bricks from an upstairs partition wall (covered in horse-hair plaster) included one dated "W. Allen 1736", were re-used to form a brick pillar in the shop.

1748 (Colin Scarrett) Lease dated 23rd August 1748 of a newly erected messuage, bank-side garden and plot of land on the West side of 'shoot', by William Allen to his son Joseph Allen at a peppercorn rent to be paid on the Feast of St. Michael the Archangel, i.e. Sept.29th.
It also says that this messuage is now in the tenure of Thomas Mundy and James Murray . The newly erected messuage of Edward Lucas being on the North side and a tenement of Walter Tuttle on the South side.

<1748 (NH) Allen built a house on the land between him and the Mill, occupied by Edward Lucas.
1751 William Allen senior, died and was buried in Hungerford in 1751.
1752 (NH) Joseph Allen mortgaged both properties. The mortgagor insisted that a clause be inserted into his agreement with Joseph Allen which transferred to him the benefits of the building's insurance policy issued by the Society of the Sun Office in London for insurance against loss or damage by fire, dated 6 July 1752 and numbered 131349. The policy was valid for the main or original messuage for a total sum not exceeding £200 and it carefully excluded "all manner of outhouses or adjoining buildings"!

1759 (NH) In 1759 his previous mortgagor having died, Allen was forced to find a new mortgage to enable him to clear that agreed in 1752. This time a local widow, Elizabeth Farrendon, came to his assistance.

1769 (NH) Joseph Allen died. His son Joseph Allen jnr (glover) inherits. By 1769 Joseph Allen had died; and his son Joseph Allen junior, also a glover, was able to clear his mortgage to Elizabeth Farrendon only by securing a further mortgage from Thomas Mundy.

1773 (NH) Finally in 1773 Mundy 'by the direction of Joseph Allen' sold to Sir William Dolben as trustee for widow Mary Garrard of Hungerford. A memo in her own handwriting recounts the building of a wall between her property and that to the south, containing a special white stone commemorating her wedding to the late George Garrard, gent. (The stone is still visible today "M.G. 1791").
1774-1780 (QR) Mr. Garrard for house late Allen's, q.r. 4d.
1795-1804 (QR) Mary Garrard for house late Allen's, q.r. 4d.

1802 (NH) Mary Garrard died, and in her will left the property to her two sisters, Mulso & Judith Whitelocke.

1802 (NH) Mulso & Judith Whitelocke had the property (at this point described as "1 messuage, 1 stable, and 1 acre of land") put up to auction at the Bear Inn in the same year, when it was purchased (for £60) by Thomas Atherton, a miller.
1805-36 (QR) Thomas Atherton (miller) - owner.

Note: the CL of 1932 describes "house formerly Mary Goddards, afterwards Thomas Atherton, then George Atherton"]
1818-23 (QR) Thomas Atherton for house late Mary Goddards, q.r. 4d.
1832 (QR) Thomas Atherton for house late Mary Goddards, q.r. 4d.

1841 (CS) ? Henry Kimber (20 years) (cattle dealer). No mention of Thomas Atherton. Note – we have Henry Kimber, cattle dealer, in 1 BS soon after

1847 (KD) John Halcombe (solicitor).
1851 (CS) John Halcombe (50) (solicitor)
1861 (CS) John Halcombe (60 years) (solicitor)
1861 (CL) Heir of Thomas Atherton (own); John Halcomb (occ)
1864 (BD) John Halcombe (solicitor)

1864 (BD) Small Primitive Methodist Chapel in Moon Lane. No attached minister.

It was Thomas George Atherton, son of Thomas Atherton who sold the north part of the premises to the Primitive Methodist Trustees on April 16th 1866 for £548. 14s.

1864-66 (KD 1891) Primitive Methodist Chapel built with 250 seats. (see Methodist Church for further details)

9 BS (which retains the Common Rights) becomes the manse for the Methodist Ministers

1869 (PO) Aaron Smith (P.M. minister)
1869-71 (MR) Levi Norris (29 years) (Minister)
1872-76 (MR) S. Hooson (Minister)
1877 (MR) Nathanial Watts (Minister)
1878-81 (MR) George Fowler (Minister)
1881 (MR) Thomas Whitehead (Minister)
1882-84 (MR) John Hancock (Minister)
1885 (MR) A.W. Badminton (Minister)
1886-88 (MR) T. Kench (Minister)
1889-90 (MR) Joseph Peck (Minister)
1891-92 (MR) J. Harrison (Minister)
1893-96 (MR) George Hull (Minister)
1896 (CL) Primitive Methodist Trustees (own); Charles Portnell (occ)
1897-99 (MR) P.T. Yarker (Minister)

Dated brick "PTY 98" found under the gutter on outside rear lean-to building when ivy was removed by Furr's ?1999.

1900-02 (MR) Charles Portnall (Minister)
1902 (T&M Register) Trustees of the Primitive Methodist Chapel (owners)
1903 (KD) Charles Portnall (Minister) entered as 2 Bridge Street.
1903 (T&M Register) Charles portnell (occupier)
1903 (MR) H.B. Goodwin (Minister)
1904 (T&M Register) H Binnall Godwin (occupier)
1904-07 (MR) H.M. Hull (Minister)
1905 (T&M Register) Harry Moore Hull (occupier)

1907 Methodist School built behind Chapel.

1908 (MR) John Booth (Minister)
1908 (T&M Register) Harry Mosdell (occupier)
1909-11 (MR) T.K. Upright (Minister)
1912-14 (MR) P.T. Yarker (Minister)
1914 (CL) Prim Methodist trustees: Harry Mosdell (Minister)
1915-19 (MR) R.J. Barrett (Minister)

1916 (NWN 23.12.1993) Francis Batt moved into this building .
1917 Frank Batt (occupier)
1920 (KD) Francis Batt and son (hairdresser) (and Barley Mow).
1929 (T&M Register) Frederick Arthur Batt (occupier)
1932 (QR) F. Batt "House formerly Mary Goddard's afterwards Thomas Atherton then George Atherton", q.r. 4d.
1939 (Blacket's) F.A. Batt, ladies and gents' hairdresser
1939 (KD) Frederick Arthur Batt (hairdresser).

Hungerford Diamond Wedding - Mr & Mrs Frank Batt

Congratulatory Telegram From the King and Queen
April 1946: Seated comfortably in a landau pulled by two lovely grey horses, Mr & Mrs Frank Batt, of "Melrose", The Prospect, Hungerford, travelled to St Lawrence's Church sixty years ago and were married by the Rev JB Anstice. The old couple, 80 and 79 respectively, celebrated their diamond wedding last Saturday, when they received many telegrams of congratulation, including one from the King and Queen, in which they take great pride.
A representative of this paper, talking to the aged pair on Wednesday, enquired what the lady's dress might have been when she and her husband went to the altar, and Mrs Batt said: "Oh, there was no special finery, but I think I looked all right." Mr Batt said his father, known as Amos, of Coombe, Hampshire, had at the time a "grey", and the landlord of the Bear Hotel had one, so they trotted to the Church as a pair.
"And what I can remember well," said Mr Batt, "is that we spent a week's honeymoon at Peterborough."
On Saturday, there were 27 relatives at "Melrose", and everybody was happy. One of the guests was a baby great-grandson. He is three months old, and his Christian name is Geoffrey, a son of Mr Kenneth Batt, who is quartermaster in the RAMC. Mr and Mrs Frank Bat's sons, Walter percy and Frederick Arthur, and his daughters Loui and Elizabeth Emma and Mrs Caswell, were among those present, as well as four grandchildren - Pamela, Patricia, Kenneth and Donald. It was Pat, aged 17, daughter of Mr and Mrs Caswell, who made and iced the large and beautiful cake, which was a notable feature of the feast. Toasts were drunk in honour of the two who have lived so happily together for so long. Mrs Batt, by the way, was Miss Sarah Ann Clifford, whose parents were at the Barley Mow Hotel, in Bridge Street, Hungerford.
Mr Batt started business as a hairdresser in Hungerford in February 1882. Owing to ill-health, he retired in 1925, and was succeeded by his son, Mr F A Batt, who had for a considerable time been with his father at the same establishment."

Passing of Mr F Batt:

Dec 1946: "Death removed another old inhabitant and well known figure in the town on the morning of Christmas Day. In business as a hairdresser, first in High Street and later in Bridge Street, for a period of more than 46 years, Mr Frank Batt, of 5 The Prospect, passed away at the age of 81. He was an interesting conversationalist on a large variety of topics; a readiness to reminisce and a happy disposition earned the esteem and respect of all who met him. He was born at Folly Farm and started business at the age of 18. Although he did not take a leading part in affairs of the town, he served as Tutti-man with mr Ernest Barnard over 40 years ago. Cycling was an early pastime; later, Mr Batt developed a keen interest in cricket. He was a member of the Hungerford Club back in the balmy days of the late Rev Denniing's captaincy. To within a few days of his short illness, Mr Batt was often seen working in his garden, the scene of so many of his happy hours. Mr and Mrs Batt celebrated their diamnond wedding on March 30 last year. Much sympathy is extended to his widow, two sons and three daughters...."

Timeline, continued:

1947 (CL) Frederick Arthur Batt (barber)
1952 (CL) Frederick Arthur Batt (barber)
1956 (CL) Frederick Arthur Batt (barber)
1961 (NWN 23.12.93) Fred Batt retired.
1963 (CL) Frederick Arthur Batt (barber)

1968 (CL) Arthur and Audrey Clifford (barber). Had been Mr Batt's assistant since 1950, taking over when Mr Batt retired in 1961.
1968 (T&M Register) Arthur Clifford (occupier)
1970 (CL) Arthur Clifford (barber)
1976 (CL) Arthur Clifford (barber)
1978 Clifford - hairdresser
1983 (CL) Arthur Clifford (barber)

1984 Methodist Church, Hall, and land, offered for sale and redevelopment. Church to join with URC in High Street.
1984 (CL) Arthur Clifford
1985 (CL) Arthur Clifford

1988 These plans were not passed. The church continued to be used. In March 1988 the two churches joined as "Christchurch", and the Bridge Street property was again offered for sale.

1993 Arthur Clifford closed in Dec 1993 after 43 years as a barber. The premises had been a barber for 77 years.

1994-95 Extensive restoration and refurbishment to the church and church hall, paid for by selling The Manse to Mr Gregory and Rachel Furr (lived in Inkpen). Whilst landscaping area behind church hall, gardener found a stone lying flat (under washing line) inscribed "Ebenezer. Samuel Chap 7 verse 12 - 1807". This was the foundation stone from the original Church Street Ebenezer Chapel, which was moved to the Wesleyan Chapel in Charnham Street 1869, and came to Bridge Street in 1972 when the Wesleyan was demolished. "Ebenezer" means "stone of thanksgiving".

1995 Re-opened Sep 1995 as Furr & Company, Goldsmiths.
1996 (T&M Register) Katherine Furr (occupier)
2000 (CL) Gregory Furr

Feb 2006 Furr & Company moved to 7 Bridge Street. "Jane Corbett Millinery" (Moved from 47 HS) ["Unique hats and head dresses designed and hand made to order, exact colour match to Clients' outfits. We also offer a handbag design-&-make service and a range of unusual jewellery, gifts & hand-made cards".]
2005 (CL) Gregory Furr

c2007 (T&M Register) Anna Harrison (occupier)

2008 Jane Corbett Millinery
2009 (?Jul) Jane Corbett Millinery moved across road to 20 BS

2009 Sep "Angela Knight" Lingerie.
2011 (CL) Angela Knight

From Norman Hidden's Papers:

1983: Site of the Methodist Chapel, Bridge St. and No. 9 Bridge Street

The history of the site goes back many centuries, probably to the original division of land along the main street into burgage tenures in the 12th or early 13th century. Certainly a house was already in existence on this site in 1470, owned by the Priory Hospital of St. John. Whether the house was used by the priory or was let to rent is not known, but its situation so near to the priory itself ( only the mill intervening between the two buildings) suggests that it may have originally been a building used for hospital purposes. By the 16th century, however , evidence suggests that it was likely to have been let as a source of rent for the priory.

When the priory was dissolved by Henry VIII in 1548 the king granted the priory property to Sir John Thynne, of Longleat fame. Thynne leased the property and in 1552 the building was said to be "late in the tenure of ..?.. Jennyns, and now of John Bytheway."

On Thynne's death the property became again at the disposal of the crown and (via court middlemen such as Dru Drury and Edward Downing) it was purchased as an investment, along with other former priory property, by Anthony Hidden, lord of the manor of Hidden - cum - Eddington. When Anthony died in 1591 it descended to his young son Roger, and was held in trust during Roger's minority by his step-father Robert Roberts of Salisbury. After coming of age, Roger Hidden sold it to a London merchant named Price who almost immediately re -sold to Dr. Thomas Sheaff, a canon of St. George's College, Windsor. Sheaff, in turn, disposed of the freehold (1612) to Henry Atkins, the sitting tenant.

The building, its accompanying garden, and a small plot of ground which separated it from the mill on the north side remained in the Atkins family for over a hundred years. William Atkins, who may have been born in the house when his father was tenant of Anthony Hidden, succeeded to the freehold when his father Henry died in 1618. William Atkins died in 1643, and in the town rent roll of 1676 the property is listed as belonging to Edward Atkins. This is presumably the Edward Atkins who is described in later deeds of the property as fellmonger, that is trader in calf and sheep skins for manufacture of leather goods (such as gloves). When Edward died he left the property and business to two sons William and Edward, who continued the business as fellmongers. In 1726 the two Atkins brothers sold the property to William Allen the elder, also a glover.

At some time before l748 Allen used the plot of ground between his house and the stream which marked the boundary with the grounds of the mill to build a new house neighbouring his own on the north side and this new house became occupied by Edward Lucas. Joseph Allen in 1752 mortgaged both properties (as well as 15 acres of land he held separately). The property is described as consisting of two messuages, 1 barn, 1 stable, 1 shop, 2 gardens and 2 orchards.

The mortgagor insisted that a clause be inserted into his agreement with Joseph Allen which transferred to him the benefits of the building's insurance policy issued by the Society of the Sun Office in London for insurance against loss or damage by fire, dated 6 July 1752 and numbered 131349. The policy was valid for the main or original messuage for a total sum not exceeding £200 and it carefully excluded "all manner of outhouses or adjoining buildings"!

In 1759 his previous mortgagor having died, Allen was forced to find a new mortgage to enable him to clear that agreed in 1752. This time a local widow, Elizabeth Farrendon, came to his assistance. By 1769 Joseph Allen had died; and his son Joseph Alien junior, also a glover, was able to clear his mortgage to Elizabeth Farrendon only by securing a further mortgage from Thomas Mundy. Finally in 1773 Mundy 'by the direction of Joseph Allen' sold to Sir William Dolben as trustee for widow Mary Garrard of Hungerford.

Among the documents which record this a the subsequent transaction, is a memorandum in Mary Garrard's handwriting which recounts the building of a wall between her property and that on its southern side, containing a special white stone commemorating her wedding to the late George Garrard, gent.

Mary Garrard died in 1802 and in her will left the property to her two sisters, Mulso & Judith Whitelocke. They had it put up to auction at the Bear Inn in the same year, when it was purchased by Thomas Atherton, a miller. Atherton is recorded in the town quit rent rolls as owner of the premises in 1805, 1818, 1832 & 1836.

I have obtained much of the detail in this record from original deeds in possession of the Methodist church (1612-1802). They were brought to my attention by Mr. Alfred Kew & most generously brought out of the church's archives & placed at my disposal through the good offices of Rev. John Morgan, the local Methodist minister, and I would like to acknowledge my debt to them in this respect.

See also:

- 1612 Indenture Sheaff to Atkins

- Will of Harriett Atherton, 7th May 1883

- NWN article 5.11.2009 re Angela Knight Lingerie opening