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George "Sidney" Shepherd (1784 – 1862) adopted the name Sidney to go with a change of style in the late 1820s.

He was a topographical, architectural and landscape painter. He lived in France until 1793, returning at the outbreak of war. He probably worked at Dr. Munro's and he was awarded a silver palette by the Society of Arts in 1803 and 1804. He toured England, but is best known for his London views, although he contributed to Britton's Architectural Antiquities and Beauties. He sketched in the Channel Islands.

He was a founder of the New Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1831 and there was a move to expel him in 1850 for non-payment of dues, but he was found to be in dire poverty and made an Honorary Member. He was granted a pension in 1860 when bedridden.

Photo Gallery:

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See also:

- "The Dictionary of British Watercolour Artists, up to 1920, Vol. 1. 2nd Edition" - H.L. Mallalieu. Antiques Collectors' Club. 1986