high_st_upr_17(c)
Home
Where are we?
Artefacts
Events
People
Places
Themes
Timeline
Archives
Brief History
Publications
Town Walks
Links
Facebook
Glossary
Search
Site Map
About us
Contact us

Website produced and maintained for the Hungerford Historical Association
by Hugh Pihlens.
This website uses 3rd party analytical cookies only.

"The website is fascinating - I've been looking at things for hours!" JS, UK, 2013

"Congratulations on an absolutely amazing site – please keep up the good work."
AT, UK, 2011

"I must congratulate you for having such an impressive and comprehensive set-up. It really is."
JS, France, 2010

"I congratulate you on the site, in particular the coaching section. Your section is far and away the most comprehensive and interesting site I have found to date. It is excellent." BJ, UK, 2009

"I've greatly enjoyed spending time visiting your virtual museum! Thank you! I found the museum to be most comprehensive and very well done, as well as very interesting."
KM, USA, 2009

Water Works
[Home] [Artefacts] [Events] [People] [Places] [Themes] [Timeline] [Archives] [Search]

You are in [Places] [Water Works]

 

Hungerford's Water Works were formed in 1903. They were built at the southern end of the town, on the west side of Salisbury Road.

In WH Summers "The Story of Hungerford" Mr Caleb Camburn (then headmaster of the Wesleyan School in Church Street) states "the first service was put in on May 1st 1904. The well shaft, bricked throughout, measures 140 feet. The adits into the chalk at the bottom allow of a day's storage, while the two surface resevoirs have each 65,000 gallons capacity. Water is lifted the 140 feet by means of a two-throw force pump and a compressed air plant, each able to deal with 3,500 gallons per hour. The height of the water in the shaft above the adits varies from 9 feet to 20 feet 6 inches, and averages 16 feet".

The Adviser of 18 Feb 2011 included a report of expansion of the resevoir:

Hungerford reservoir, off Sanden Road, is being expanded to safeguard the town's water resources for at least the next 25 years. The 2.2 megalitre enclosed reservoir will be expanded by 1.1 megalitres.

Thames Water will spend the next six months, from February 17 to the end of August, building an additional cell on the reservoir to increase its capacity by a third. Lawrence Gosden, Thames Water's head of capital delivery, said: "We provide THE essential service - clean, safe drinking water and sanitation - to nearly 14m people across London and the Thames Valley, and as a long-term business our job is to make sure we can do this effectively not Just today but for many decades to come.

"Expanding Hungerford reservoir will enable our water resources to keep pace with the forecast rise in demand caused by predicted population growth for at least the next 25 years. "Each one of our water customers uses a tonne a week of water on average.  Making sure there is enough to go round is a must-do job, which is why the 800,000 project we're doing at Hungerford is so important."

The new cell on the covered-over reservoir, which supplies 2,800 properties in the Hungerford area, is being designed to fit sympathetically into its new surroundings, with all efforts made to minimise the impact of the work on nearby residents.

Anthony Buckwell, the mayor of Hungerford, said: "Improving the town's water supply is something to be welcomed in light of probable increases in population in future.

The Newbury Weekly News of 24 Feb 2011 reported:

Work begins on reservoir project:

An 800,000 project is under way to expand Hungerford reservoir's capacity by a third.

Thames Water will spend the next six months, until the end of August, building an additional cell on the reservoir, which, the company says, will safeguard the town's water resources for at least the next 25 years.

Thames Water's head of capital delivery, Lawrence Gosden, said: "We provide the essential service - clean, safe drinking water and sanitation -to nearly 14m people across London and the Thames Valley and as a long-term business our job is to make sure we can do this effectively, not just today, but for many decades to come.

"Expanding Hungerford reservoir will enable our water resources to keep pace with the forecast rise in demand caused by predicted population growth for at least the next 25 years. Each one of our water customers uses a tonne a week of water on average. Making sure there is enough to go round is a must-do job, which is why the 800,000 project we're doing at Hungerford is so important."

Improving the town's water supply is something to be welcomed in light of probable increases in population in future.

Thames Water said that the new cell on the covered-over reservoir, which supplies 2,800 properties in the Hungerford area, was being designed to "fit sympathetically to its new surroundings, with all efforts made to minimise the impact of the work on nearby residents".

Hungerford mayor Anthony Buckwell said: "Improving the town's water supply is something to be welcomed in light of probable increases in population in future. We will obviously be keeping a close eye on Thames Water to ensure the expansion work at the reservoir is carried out as sensitively as possible."

The reservoir acts as a holding tank, taking in water from the adjacent water treatment plant during off-peak periods so there is enough to supply all customers in the area when demand for water increases.

Water is abstracted from underground boreholes before being treated, cleaned and fed into Hungerford reservoir, which stores the water and feeds it on demand into the local mains network to go to people's taps.

 

The Newbury Weekly News of 29 Sep 2011 reported:

Work to improve town's reservoir nears completion:

An 800,000 project to expand Hungerford reservoir's capacity by a third is almost finished, Thames Water said this week.

The company began building an additional cell on the reservoir off Salisbury Road in February, to safeguard the town's water resources for at least the next 25 years.

Hungerford is a storage reservoir - a covered-over holding tank that stores treated water on its way to 2,800 properties in the area.

Thames Water's head of capital delivery, Lawrence Gosden, said: "We provide essential service - clean, safe drinking water and sanitation - to nearly 14m people across London and the Thames Valley, and as a longterm business our job is t make sure we can do this effectively, not just today, but for many decades to come.

"Expanding Hungerford reservoir will enable our water resources to keep pace with the forecast rise in demand caused by predicted population growth for at least the next 25 years. Each one of our water customers uses a tonne a week of water on average. Making sure there is enough to go round is a must-do job, which is why the 800,000 project we're doing at Hungerford is so important."

Thames Water said that the new cell on the covered-over reservoir was designed to "fit sympathetically to its new surroundings, with all efforts to minimise the impact of the work on nearby residents."

Former town councillor Anthony Buckwell, who was mayor at the time the work began, said in February: "Improving the town's water supply is something to be welcomed in light of probable increases in population in future."

The reservoir acts as a holding tank, taking in water from the adjacent treatment plant during off-peak periods so there is enough to supply all customers in the area when demand for water increases.

Water is abstracted from underground bore holes before being treated, cleaned and fed into Hungerford reservoir, which stores the water and feeds it on demand into the local mains network to go to people's taps.

The project is now in its final stages ahead of a four-week testing period to ensure the extension to the reservoir is working as planned.

Mr Gosden said: "All Hungerford's water comes from the Kennet catchment and is returned there after it is used, causing no lasting environmental impact on this important chalk stream and the wildlife habitats it supports."

 

See also:
- Hungerford Gas Works
- Wessex Electricity Company
- Mains Drainage Scheme

Updated: 6.10.2011

Back to Top